FASHION

FAST FASHION THAT IS

The fashion industry, boy oh boy this my world shook on it’s ground then I dipped my toes in the vast waters of the fashion industry. So this industry is not only extremely toxic to the environment, it’s also horrible for it’s workers AND most clothing is actually making us sick without us realizing it. Since we can’t go Adam and Eve all day erryday day and it’s not all doom and gloom I’ve listed some awesome brands that are doing their best to provide us lovely woke people with clothing and accessories that are made sustainable and ethical. 

I’ve also listed the 3 main negative impacts that fast fashion has. Now we can’t control everything but we can control how we act upon it, so I suggest we (once again) educate ourselves and make choices that resonate with us and fit our finances. Buying sustainable fashion is an investment and understandably not available for everyone, but once 

ENVIRONMENT

The fashion industry has a disastrous impact on the environment. In fact, it is the second largest polluter in the world, just after the oil industry. And the environmental damage is increasing as the industry grows.

In most of the countries where our garments are produced, untreated toxic wastewaters  are dumped directly into the rivers.

Wastewater contains toxic substances such as lead, mercury, and arsenic, among others. These are extremely harmful for the aquatic life and the health of the millions people living by those rivers banks. The contamination also reaches the sea and eventually spreads around the entire world. 

Another major source of water contamination is the use of fertilizers for cotton production, which heavily pollutes runoff waters and evaporation waters.

The fashion industry is a major water consumer. 
Huge quantity of fresh water are used for the dyeing and finishing process for all of our clothes.  

Also, cotton needs A LOT of water to grow (and heat), but is usually cultivated in warm and dry areas. Up to 20,000 liters of water are needed to produce just 1kg of cotton. This generates tremendous pressure on this precious resource, already scarce, and has dramatic ecological consequences such as the desertification of the Aral Sea, where cotton production has entirely drained the water (see pictures above).  

Text from sustainyourstyle

SLAVERY

According to the CNN Freedom Project, modern slavery is defined as “when one person completely controls another person, using violence or the threat of violence to maintain that control, exploits them economically and they can not walk away”. 

Slavery in the fashion world can appear in a variety of forms from harvesting the cotton for a t-shirt, spinning the fibre to yarn, sewing the garment and modelling the final product. The difference between slavery and extremely exploitative labour can be vague and the fashion industry walks a fine line.

It is wise to note that many large fashion brands and companies do not have full control over their supply chains, thus making illegal work practices possible (including sweatshops, trafficking and servitude). Much of the labour and backbone of a clothing collection is contracted out to various players and tracing all the steps from raw material to final product proves quite difficult, thus making exploitation and illegal activities get unnoticed.

The non-profit Free2Work has been tracking well known brands such as Gap, H&M, Levis, and Adidas (to name a few) and ranking them on an A-F scale for “policies, transparency, traceability, monitoring and training or worker rights”. Very few brands received an A and most had D-F grades. Giving consumers the tools they need to make the right purchases is just one part of the process in ending slavery.

Text from thefashionglobe

TOXIC

Most of the clothing that we buy and wear  also have a serious impact on our health.

As we experienced first hand all of our living expenses have gone up in the last years, our rent, food, trips, books, literally EVERYTHING except for our clothes, our clothing in some occasions have even become cheaper! This is been made possible by big factories not treating their workers fairly but also using materials and textiles that are chemical. Stuff that we shouldn’t even be close to let alone wear 24/7!! Most of the processes used in dying and forming the fabrics we’re used to are dangerous and have a massive impact on the planet and our well being!  Imagine dressing your children in toxins, sweating during a work out in clothing that contains loads of chemicals, putting on new underwear everyday that are filled with carcinogens not even to mention the sheets we sleep in and the pyjamas we wear, it’s absolutely mind boggling that we don’t get proper information about this. 

Goop has an extensive piece about this with a clear table of which toxins you can find in each textile and what the concerns linked to these toxins are. Also if you want to get more in depth about what these toxins can do to your health check out  Darin Oliens podcast, episode 36 with Jeff Garner, it’ll blow your mind. 

BRANDS

SUSTAINABLE BRANDS

WHAT BRANDS CAN WE SUPPORT

Victoria's Secret

This is the biggest retailer of lingerie in the USA.

Victoria’s Secret has also been revealed to use toxic chemicals in that same Greenpeace report mentioned above.

In addition, the brand is not transparent about the factories it’s working with. The company also fails to provide a living wage to its garment workers.

Reasons not to buy from them?

Too many to list.

They include formaldehyde lawsuits, child labor, allegations of trans phobia, sexual harassment of their models…

PRIMARK

Under garnment

Primark clothes are famous for their extremely low prices and maybe even lower quality. Of course, the brand is rated as “Not Good Enough” on Good On You because of its huge carbon footprint, its incredible amount of waste production, its lack of transparency, and its use of unsustainable materials. Primark needs to be stopped if we want to have a greener future!

URBAN OUTFITTERS

Sports wear

Urban Outfitters has been in the spotlight for so many controversies. I guess they try to be edgy with their designs, but many times it comes off as simply offensive.

The company’s CEO, Richard Hayne is obviously homophobic and has donated to anti-gay marriage and anti-abortion organizations. He also owns Anthropologie and Free People, by the way.

There was another scandal when Urban Outfitters workers were had to work on the weekend for free disguised as “training days”. A brand that tries to pull off things like this probably doesn’t care about the living wage and working conditions of its garment workers.

UNIQLO

Shoes & Bags

This is a Japanese brand which offers casual clothing. They operate in Japan and other international markets

Why shouldn’t you shop there? Uniqlo have been hit by a number of controversies in recent years.

In 2015, several labor rights violations were reported from one of their suppliers in China.

In 2016, it was alleged that Uniqlo still expected staff to work “excessive overtime” for low rates of pay, in dangerous conditions which had a culture of bullying and harassment.

HARMFULL BRANDS

WHAT BRANDS SHOULD WE TRY TO AVOID

INDITEX

28.2 billion 2019 revenue

ZARA, Pull&Bear, MANGO, Bershka, Massimo Duti, OYSHO and Stradivarius all fall under the same fashion group. No surprise there since they all come up with new lines every 2 to 3 weeks and quality wise you might need something new every other month.. These brands are not sustainable due to the fact of poor quality and unfair working conditions. Their fabric workers are grossly underpaid while Inditex is making massive profits and not investing any of it in the betterment of their workers or the planet. 

H&M GROUP

20.3 billion 2019 revenue

H&M, COS, WEEKDAY, Monki, &OtherStories, ARKET and Afound all fall under the H&M group. H&M is great in green washing, while they have a more sustainable conscious collection it actually blends sustainable materials with other materials to keep the prices low. The fabric blends can’t be recycled which therefor contradicts with the whole recycling campaign. They’ve also made promises in 2013 after the Raza Plaza collaps to provide fair wages to their workers by 2018, it’s 2020 ya’ll and they’re still not paying living wages or are able to maintain safety regulations. 

NIKE

32.3 billion 2019 revenue

With about 2 million shoes a day (not even counting all other garments they produce) can you imagine how much waist Nike produces in a day? Also according to Greenpeace Nike uses chemical toxins that aren’t  only very damaging to the environment, but also hazardous to the workers. 

Whereas Adidas is also not there yet they’re making more of an effort to give some transparency in their products, they’ve set up actual sustainability plans and are following through. If you need to choose between the two, you know what to do. 

SHEIN & ZAFUL

750 million & 50 million 2019 revenue

Just putting these brands together for the sake of it, two peas in pot really.

“They find popular designs from other retailers and make very cheap copies of them. Sometimes the item on the picture is the original, and what you get is completely different. But who cares when a dress costs $8 right? Well, we should care because if their clothes look like garbage, you won’t wear them and they’ll probably end up in landfills. The business model is based on deceiving the people who shop there and destroying the environment and most probably underpaid workers! We shouldn’t support brands that do these kind of things with our money!” Well said by the pretty planeteer


BATHING SUITS | $$

APPERAL| $$$

ORGANIC BASICS

UNDERGARNMENT | $$

WEARETALA

ACTIVE WEAR | $$

KUYICHI

KINGS OF INDIDGO

PIXIE MOOD

BAGS | $$

MATT&NAT

SHOES & BAGS | $$

GIRLFRIEND COLLECTIVE

ACTIVE WEAR | $$

NOBODY'S CHILD

APPAREL | $

BAGS | $$$

TAMGA DESIGN

APPAREL | $$$

DOCUMENTARIES

TRUE COST

Forks Over Knives examines the profound claim that most, if not all, of the chronic diseases that afflict us can be controlled or even reversed by rejecting animal-based and processed foods.
The major storyline traces the personal journeys of Dr. T. Colin Campbell, a nutritional biochemist from Cornell University, and Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn, a former top surgeon at the world-renowned Cleveland Clinic. On separate paths, their discoveries and groundbreaking research led them to the same startling conclusion: Chronic diseases including heart disease and type 2 diabetes can almost always be prevented—and in many cases reversed—by adopting a whole-food, plant-based diet.

The idea of food as medicine is put to the test. The film follows everyday Americans with chronic conditions as they seek to reduce their dependence on medications and learn to use a whole-food, plant-based diet to regain control over their health and their lives. Check out Netflix for this documentary. 

RIVERBLUE

The C word, a documentary about the effort to prevent cancer. Meghan who is a cancer survivor and also the director of this film joints forces with Dr. David Servan-Schreiber, a French physician and neuroscientist. Together they expose the systematic failings in our society which reinforce the bad habits that predispose us to disease. An eye opening documentary that’s definitely worth the watch! Although the content can be quite shocking The C Word is narrated by Morgan Freeman which makes everything just a little bit better..  You can find The C Word on Netflix.

SLOWING DOWN FAST FASHION

Forks Over Knives examines the profound claim that most, if not all, of the chronic diseases that afflict us can be controlled or even reversed by rejecting animal-based and processed foods.
The major storyline traces the personal journeys of Dr. T. Colin Campbell, a nutritional biochemist from Cornell University, and Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn, a former top surgeon at the world-renowned Cleveland Clinic. On separate paths, their discoveries and groundbreaking research led them to the same startling conclusion: Chronic diseases including heart disease and type 2 diabetes can almost always be prevented—and in many cases reversed—by adopting a whole-food, plant-based diet.

The idea of food as medicine is put to the test. The film follows everyday Americans with chronic conditions as they seek to reduce their dependence on medications and learn to use a whole-food, plant-based diet to regain control over their health and their lives. Check out Netflix for this documentary. 

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